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GMAT is organized by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC) throughout the year. This test is required for getting admission to MBA programs globally or for Masters in Finance& related courses as well as some PhD courses. The GMAT exam syllabus comprises 4 sections which can be referred to as the GMAT subjects, altogether. The entire GMAT syllabus for each of the subjects will be discussed with you in this post. The 4 sections or subjects of the GMAT exam syllabus are:

  1. Analytical Writing Assessment
  2. Integrated Reasoning
  3. Quantitative Reasoning
  4. Verbal Reasoning       

There is only one universal GMAT syllabus for MBA as well as other Master’s courses including Master’s in Finance, Accounting, Human Resource Management, Manufacturing Systems Technology, Sports Management or MS in Information Systems, etc. or even some PhD programs such as those in Management-Marketing, Operations Management, Economics, Accounting, Finance, Agribusiness, Management Information Systems etc. All GMAT subjects are detailed in the following sections.

GMAT Subjects 2020: All the 4 Sections of the Syllabus of GMAT
GMAT Subjects 2020: All the 4 Sections of the Syllabus of GMAT

GMAT Exam Syllabus: Summary of the Exam Pattern

GMAT is a computer – adaptive exam, which means that upcoming questions get tougher if you keep getting answers right. There is no negative marking in the GMAT exam pattern. Your GMAT score shall be valid for a period of 5 years. 

The GMAT exam syllabus consists of 4 sections, as already mentioned, spanning approximately at 3 hours and 30 minutes including 2 optional breaks of 8 minutes each. Recently, GMAC announced the Select Section Order provision which will enable you to select the order of the sections in which you want to write your exam. Selecting your preferred order is one of the tasks that you will have to do before starting with your exam.

MODULENO. OF QUESTIONSQUESTIONS TYPESDURATION (MINUTES)SCORE RANGE
Syllabus of GMAT: Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA)1Analysis of an Argument300 – 6
(in 0.5  increment)
Syllabus of GMAT: Integrated Reasoning12Multi-Source ReasoningGraphics Interpretation2-Part AnalysisTable Analysis301 – 8
(in 1-point increment)
Syllabus of GMAT: Quantitative Reasoning31  Data Sufficiency Problem Solving626 – 51
(in 1-point increments)
Syllabus of GMAT:Verbal Reasoning36Reading ComprehensionCritical ReasoningSentence Correction656 – 51
(in 1-point increments)
Sometimes an un-scored section is given as part of your test after AWA section.
An identified research section that is not scored may be included, and it is always at the end of the test.
GMAT Exam Syllabus 2020: Short Summary of 4 GMAT Sections
GMAT Subjects: Analytical Writing Assessmentmeasures your ability to think critically and to communicate your ideas
GMAT Subjects: Integrated Reasoningmeasures your ability to analyze data and evaluate information presented in multiple formats
GMAT Subjects: Quantitative Reasoningmeasures your ability to analyze data and draw conclusions using reasoning skills
GMAT Subjects: Verbal Reasoningmeasures your ability to read and understand written material, to evaluate arguments and to correct written material to conform to standard written English
GMAT Subjects 2020: What Each Paper Measures?

We will now discuss what you are required to know for each portion of the test (entire syllabus of GMAT subjects in detail), what type of questions you may expect and we will also review the core skills you will need for each type of questions

GMAT Syllabus Part I – Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA)

We’ll be discussing the kinds of topics you will be asked to write about and how you will be expected to write about those topics. We will also review strategies for effective analytical writing and learn specific tips and strategies that can be used on the exam.

There may be two kinds of questions in AWA:

  • Analysis of an argument
  • Analysis of an issue

On the day of the actual test, you will get only 1 essay and 30 minutes for it. 

Here in the pretest we’ve tried to present both the types of questions for your practice. Take 30 minutes for each and not longer.

GMAT Subjects: AWA Assessment Pretest

Make every effort to write your essays on a computer with a basic word processor. The more practice you have composing and revising on the computer, the more comfortable you will be on the exam.

Read the second only after you have completed the first essay and are ready to begin the second.

GMAT Subjects AWA: Question 1- Analysis of an Argument

GMAT Subjects: Analytical Writing Pretest Question 1
GMAT Subjects: Analytical Writing Pretest Question 1

Directions: In your essay, be sure to analyze the argument’s logic and use of evidence. Discuss how well-reasoned you find this argument. For example, you may need to consider whether alternative explanations or counterarguments would weaken the conclusion or whether the assumptions underlying the argument are sound. We would also want you to write about the kind of evidence you think will strengthen or refute the argument, what revisions would you want to make to the argument to make it more reasonable, or what missing information would help you better evaluate the argument. Complete your essay in 30 minutes.

GMAT Subjects AWA: Question 2- Analysis of an Issue:

GMAT Subjects: Analytical Writing Assessment Pretest Question 2
GMAT Subjects: Analytical Writing Assessment Pretest Question 2

Directions: Support your position with reasons and/or examples from your own experience, observations, or reading. Discuss whether you agree or disagree with this opinion and to what extent. Complete this in 30 minutes.

AWA Syllabus of GMAT – Explaining the Characteristics of a Desirable Answer for a Perfect Score 6:

  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 1
  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 2

GMAT Exam Syllabus AWA Question Types: Analysis of an Argument

A short argument (1 paragraph, that is, 1 to 5 sentences long) will be presented to you. You will be given the task to critically assess the reasoning behind that argument. In this essay, you should not waste time over offering your opinion of the issue in the argument. Instead, your answer must offer an assessment of the argument by evaluating the logic (or lack thereof) of the claims.

Argument Topics

A majority of the topics are somehow related to business. You will not need to have any specific knowledge about that topic. For example, in the pretest the question is business-related, but you do not need to know anything about owning a restaurant to successfully judge the argument. You just have to analyze the argument and present your analysis in an organized and engaging manner.

Topics may range among anything. However, these may help you.

Syllabus of GMAT: List of Examples of Argument Topics
Syllabus of GMAT: List of Examples of Argument Topics

Analyzing the Argument

While Analyzing an Argument, You Must Consider These Questions
Syllabus of GMAT: While Analyzing an Argument, You Must Consider These Questions

Okay, easiest trick to quick progress in AWA will be to recognize at least 1 significant flaw in the otherwise logical argument presented to you in the exam. You can find that the argument may:

Significant Flaws in An Argument That Could lead Your Way
Significant Flaws in An Argument That Could lead Your Way

Solid critical reasoning skills are essential for the critical reasoning questions on the Verbal section and also for an effective analysis of the argument on the AWA.

GMAT Exam Syllabus AWA Question Types: Analysis of an Issue

A short statement (1 to 3 sentences) about an issue will be presented to you. You will have to clearly state your opinion and support that opinion with specific reasons and examples. You will be asked to take a position on the issue.

Issue Topics

Topics may range among anything, including business, social, political, or ethical matters.

Syllabus of GMAT: List of Examples of Issue Topics
Syllabus of GMAT: List of Examples of Issue Topics

Analyzing the Issue

Consider the following questions when you are planning a response to the issue given:

Ask yourself these Questions While Attempting to Analyze an Issue
Ask yourself these Questions While Attempting to Analyze an Issue

Not enough time will be available to you to build an extensively comprehensive review, presenting all the pros and cons of each side. However, your answer must be able to do the following:

  1. Acknowledge the other side: You must be able to especially acknowledge powerful counterarguments that might have been made by the opposition if you are standing against the issue.
  2. Concede serious drawbacks or flaws in your position: you must be able to admit any downside / negative aspect that may be responsible to pull your position down.

GMAT Exam Syllabus of AWA: List of 6 Characteristics of a Great Essay

The 6 characteristics of a Great Essay to earn a 4, 5, or 6 on the AWA
The 6 characteristics of a Great Essay to earn a 4, 5, or 6 on the AWA

Did You Know? You can complete an official practice AWA and have it scored by the GMAC for a fee of $20 in the same way your GMAT AWA will be scored.

GMAT Exam Syllabus of AWA: Essay Structure in Three Parts

  1. Introduction – State your thesis. Introduce to your audience what you’re about to tell them
  2. Body – Tell your Audience
  3. Conclusion – Gist up what you’ve just told your audience. Finish up.

INTRODUCTION

An introduction is supposed to be equipped enough to grab the reader’s attention and establish the tone of the passage.

GMAT Exam Syllabus of AWA Essay: You can open your essay with one of these
GMAT Exam Syllabus of AWA Essay: You can open your essay with one of these

BODY

Write the body of your essay paragraph by paragraph. Do not forget about transitions between paragraphs, key words and phrases like similarly, more important, and in addition to guide your reader through. You can use the list of transitional words given earlier in this post

CONCLUSION

  • Your final words must have the power to ring in readers’ ears for a long time afterward. People typically remember what comes first and last.
  • Restate the main idea and its core support.
  • Provide a sense of closure (does not “open a new can of worms” by introducing a new topic).
  • Arouse readers’ emotions to make the ending and main idea memorable. To make conclusions memorable, you can use the following techniques:
    • a quotation
    • a question
    • an anecdote
    • a prediction
    • a solution or recommendation
    • a call to action

In your final paragraph, you are required to restate your thesis, but not in the exact same words. Do not introduce any new topic. Instead, you shall have to make your readers feel as if you have covered your topic thoroughly and that they have gotten something meaningful from reading your essay.

GMAT Syllabus Part II – Quantitative Reasoning

Questions basically consist of arithmetic, algebra, and geometry.

The majority of the questions will need to be solved using arithmetic. This area of mathematics includes the

  • basic operations of numbers (addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division)
  • properties and types of numbers
  • number theory
  • counting problems

Algebra includes using

  • polynomials
  • using laws of exponents
  • solving linear and quadratic equations
  • solving inequalities
  • simplifying rational expressions

Geometric applications may be integrated with other concepts. You will require the knowledge of

  • polygons
  • plane figures
  • right triangles
  • formulae for determining the area, perimeter, volume, and surface area of an object

A portion of the questions will appear in a word-problem format with graphs, logic problems, as well as other discrete math areas scattered throughout this section. You must also remember that a few of the questions will be experimental. These will not be counted in your final score. However, you will not be able to tell which questions are experimental.


GMAT Syllabus of Quantitative Reasoning: Types of Questions

  1. Problem Solving – while answering problem-solving questions, try and eliminate improbable answers first to increase your chances of finding the correct solution.
GMAT Subjects: Quantitative Reasoning - A Sample Problem Solving Question
GMAT Subjects: Quantitative Reasoning – A Sample Problem Solving Question

2. Data Sufficiency – you will have to be able to determine at what point there is enough data to solve a problem

GMAT Subjects: Quantitative Reasoning - A Sample Data Sufficiency Question (Directions)
GMAT Subjects: Quantitative Reasoning – A Sample Data Sufficiency Question (Directions)
GMAT Subjects: Quantitative Reasoning - A Sample Data Sufficiency Question & Answer
GMAT Subjects: Quantitative Reasoning – A Sample Data Sufficiency Question & Answer

Detailed GMAT Syllabus of Quantitative Reasoning: Arithmetic

1. Types of numbers

  • Real numbers
  • Rational numbers (Any number that can be expressed as a/b, where b is not equal to 0)
  • Irrational numbers (nonrepeating, nonterminating decimal)
  • Integers (…–2, –1, 0, 1, 2, 3…)
  • Whole numbers (0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, . . . )
  • Natural numbers (1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, . . .)

2. Properties of numbers

  • Commutative property
  • Associative property
  • Identity property
  • Inverse property
  • Distributive property

3. Order of operations – BEMDAS

  • 2 × 3 + 4 – 2
  • 32 – 16 – (5 – 1)
  • [2 (42 – 9) + 3] –1

4. Special Defined Operations – Exclusive to GMAT Syllabus

Some questions may involve operations that use symbols like #, $, &, or @.

Example of Special Operations Exclusive to GMAT Syllabus
Example of Special Operations Exclusive to GMAT Syllabus

Correct Answer is “D”

5. Factors, Multiples and Divisibility

  • Prime Factoring
  • Greatest Common Factor (GCF)
  • Multiples & Least Common Multiple
  • Divisibility

6. Prime & Composite Numbers

This part includes natural numbers whose only factors are 1 and itself (prime) as well as natural numbers that are not prime (composite). It also includes pairs of relatively prime numbers whose GCF is 1.

7. Even/ Odd Numbers

8. Consecutive Integers

Consecutive integers differ by 1. An example of three consecutive integers is 3, 4, and 5, or –11,    –10, and –9.

9. Absolute Value

The absolute value or modulus of a number is the distance a number is away from zero on a number line.

  • |4| = 4; four units from zero on a number line
  • |–3| = 3; three units from zero on a number line

10. Operations with Real Numbers

  • Adding, subtracting, multiplying, dividing integers
  • Reducing fractions, adding/ subtracting fractions
  • Multiplying &Dividing fractions
  • Adding, subtracting, multiplying Decimals
  • Ratio, proportion, percent, exponents
  • Square roots
  • Radicals
  • Counting problems and probability
  • Permutations & combinations
  • Mean, median, mode 

Detailed GMAT Syllabus of Quantitative Reasoning: Algebra

1. Translating Equations & Expressions

This chart will help you with key words used in GMAT questions. For example, the key words less than tell you to subtract from the number and the key word product reminds you to multiply.

GMAT Exam Syllabus Quantitative Algebra Chart of Key Words
GMAT Exam Syllabus Quantitative Algebra Chart of Key Words

Examples:

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Use of Key Words in Questions
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Use of Key Words in Questions

2. Combining Like Terms and Polynomials

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Like Terms
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Like Terms
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Polynomials
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Polynomials

3. Laws of Exponents

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Exponents
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Exponents

4. Linear Equations in 1 variable

Example: 8x – 2 = 8 + 3x (solve for x)

5. Literal Equations

Example:  2x + b = a (solve for x)

6. Inequalities (including compound inequalities)

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Inequalities
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Inequalities

7. Multiplying & Factoring Polynomials

8. Quadratic equations

An equation in the form y = ax 2 + bx + c, where a, b, and c are real numbers, is a quadratic equation. In other words, the greatest exponent on x is two.

9. Rational Expressions and Equations

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Rational Expressions and Equations
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Rational Expressions and Equations

10. Coordinate Graphing

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Coordinate Graphing
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Coordinate Graphing

11. Slope

12. Equations with 2 variablesElimination & Substitution Methods

13. Word Problems

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Word Problems
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Word Problems

Your answer should be “b”

14. Distance Problems

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Distance Problems
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Distance Problems

Your answer should be “b”

15. Ratio Word Problems

GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 3
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Ratio Word Problems

Your answer should be “a”

16. Work Problems

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Work Problems
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Work Problems

Your answer should be “a”

17. Functions

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Functions
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Algebra: Functions

GMAT Syllabus of Quantitative Reasoning: Geometry

  • ANGLES
    • Lines & angles
    • Parallel lines & Angles
      • Corresponding
      • Alternate interior
      • Alternate exterior
      • Adjacent
      • Vertical
  • POLYGONS
  • TRIANGLES
    • Triangle inequality
    • Right triangles
    • Pythagorean theorem
    • Special right triangles
      • 45-45-90
      • 30-60-90
    • Pythagorean triples
  • QUADRILATERALS
  • CIRCLES
  • MEASUREMENT & GEOMETRY
    • Perimeter
    • Circumference
    • Area
    • Volume
    • Surface area
    • Circle equations

GMAT Syllabus Practice Tips& Strategies: Quantitative Reasoning

  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 4
  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 5
  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 6
  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 7

GMAT Syllabus Part III – Verbal Reasoning

This section consists of 3 types of questions:

  1. Reading Comprehension
  2. Critical Reasoning
  3. Sentence Completion

The 36 questions in the Verbal section are divided evenly among these 3 types. Each category contains approximately 11—12 questions, and you will have 65 minutes to complete this portion of the test

You will also find many concepts & skills to be common to the Verbal section and the Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) section.

Summary of GMAT Syllabus of Verbal Section

List of 26 Topics you must practice:

Argument constructionRedundancy
Argument EvaluationThe Subjunctive Mood
Formulating and Evaluating a plan of ActionContextual Clues
Pronoun AgreementSentence Fragments
Pronoun AmbiguityParallel Construction Error
IdiomsFaulty Comparison
Misplaced ModifiersPunctuation
Parallel ConstructionWord Confusion
Verb TensesAdjective/Adverb Error
Subject and Verb Agreement/ DisagreementCorrect pronoun usage
Noun AgreementVerb Tense Error
Comparison WordsMisplaced Modifier
Quantity WordsIncorrect Idiomatic Expression
GMAT Syllabus of Verbal Section: List of 26 Topics you must practice

Verb Forms

  1. Tense
    • Present tense
    • Present participle
    • Past tense
    • Past participle
  2. Regular verbs
  3. Irregular verbs
GMAT Syllabus of Verbal Reasoning: Irregular Verb Forms TO BE
GMAT Syllabus of Verbal Reasoning: Irregular Verb Forms TO BE

4. Helping Verbs

5. Subjunctive Mood

6. Gerunds & Infinitives

7. Troublesome verbs

GMAT Syllabus of Verbal Reasoning: Troublesome Verbs
GMAT Syllabus of Verbal Reasoning: Troublesome Verbs

Prefixes,Suffixes, and Word Roots

A prefix means a syllable specifically added to the beginning of a word to particularly alter or add to its meaning. For example, omni-, micro-, ante-, tetra- etc.

A suffix means a syllable specifically added to the end of a word to particularly alter or add to its meaning.For example, -ance, -tion, -al, -ic etc.

Many words in the English language derive from Latin. The Latin words serve as roots, providing the core meaning of the words; prefixes, suffixes, and other alterations give each word its distinct meaning. For example, verbum, sentire, positum etc.

Many other English words are derived from the ancient Greek language. For example, krates, metron, geo etc.

Detailed Syllabus of GMAT Verbal: Reading Comprehension

Let’s first take an assessment pretest so you can know how much you are already capable of with regards to this sub-section of Verbal. We will present to you a couple of questions.

Assessment Pretest

GMAT syllabus 2020: Part 1 of Reading Comprehension Passage
GMAT syllabus 2020: Part 1 of Reading Comprehension Passage
GMAT syllabus 2020: Part 2 of Reading Comprehension Passage
GMAT syllabus 2020: Part 2 of Reading Comprehension Passage
GMAT syllabus 2020: Reading Comprehension Questions Page 1
GMAT syllabus 2020: Reading Comprehension Questions Page 1
GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 8
GMAT syllabus 2020: Reading Comprehension Questions Page 2
Answers to your Pretest

1 (C), 2 (E), 3 (D)

How did it go? Congratulations if you answered nearly all of the questions correctly. Perhaps your reading comprehension skills are strong. Clearly, the more questions you get wrong, the more time you should devote to the review of that material.It is difficult to scale your performance on this pretest, because in GMAT both the number of questions answered and the level of difficulty of each question are used to determine your score. However, a simple percentage of correctly answered questions in each category should give you a good indication.

Reading comprehension questions that test your ability to read and understand sophisticated written texts

GMAT Syllabus of Reading Comprehension: Types of Passages

  1. These passages are either argumentative or informative.
  2. The passages of Reading Comprehension section are usually academic in nature.
  3. These may revolve around any topic from the physical or life sciences, social sciences, humanities, or business, but you do not need to be familiar with the topic to be able to answer the questions.
  4. The questions will typically test what you understand and can logically infer from the information in the text, not what you may already know about the topic.
  5. The narration type is serious and sophisticated.
  6. Most passages contain between 4 and 7 paragraphs and are about 150 to 350 words long.
  7. You will typically be asked 3 to 5 questions about each passage.
  8. An argumentative passage, for example, might argue that Einstein’s theory of relativity is the most important scientific discovery of the twentieth century; that the theory of relativity dramatically altered humans’ understanding of their place in the universe, and their relationships to each other.
  9. An informative passage might, on the other hand,explain Einstein’s theory of relativity, evaluate its impact on science and society, or discuss how current findings in physics are forcing a revision of Einstein’s theory.
  10. Some passages are both. For example, aninformative + argumentative passage may inform about the theory of relativity in the first 3 paragraphs and argue about it in the last 3 that it is the most important scientific discovery of the twentieth century.

GMAT Syllabus of Reading Comprehension: Types of Questions

The GMAT Verbal section has essentially 4 types of reading comprehension questions:

Basic comprehension questions ask about the best way to paraphrase a definition orkey concept discussed in the passage or the main idea of the text. These test your ability to understand the words and ideas expressed in thepassage.

Analysis questions ask you to identify the main idea, to identify the strongest support, to distinguish between main and supporting ideas, or to identify the organizational pattern of the text. These test your ability to see the structure of a passage and if you can understand the relationship between theideas in the passage.

Inference questions ask you how the author feels about a related subject. These test your ability to draw logical conclusions based upon the facts and ideas expressed in the passage.

Quantitative interpretation questions test your ability to use information to determine which aspect or featureof the subject has a particular characteristic or which prediction about the subject appears to be most logical based on thequantitative information in the passage.

GMAT Exam Syllabus of Reading Comprehension: List of 9 things you need to know

Active Reading
  • Preview & Review

Previewing a reading-comprehension passage only takes a few seconds but it can make a tremendous difference in how much you understand from the text. Before you actually begin reading, quickly scan the text.Try to make sense out of what the passage can be about.Previewing works by planting comprehension clues in your mind. See the emphasis of the passage and the writer’s tone.

  • Expand your Vocabulary

The GMAT exam does not directly test your vocabulary. All it does is use texts that include sophisticated terms.Have a dictionary with you when you read. Look up any unfamiliar words right away.Try to figure out what a word may mean from its context.

For example, in the sentence “The negotiations were stymied by the union’s refusal to consider an alternate benefits package”, you can tell that stymie is not a good thing, even if you do not know exactly what the word means.

  • Mark up the Text
  1. Highlight or underline keywords and ideas.
  2. Take notes
Topic vs. Main Idea

The main idea is actually the key concept or thought that the writer conveys in the text.The topic is the subject of a passage or what the passage is about. The main idea, on the other hand, is what the writer wants to say about that subject.

Locating the Main Idea

They are often located at the beginning of the passage or paragraph. Thesis statements are sometimes found at the end of the introductory paragraph of an essay. This is certainly not always the case.Sometimes writers may actually begin with specific supporting ideas and finally lead up to the main idea.

Transitional Words

These transitions are some of the most common words and phrases used to introduce specific examples:

for example     for instance      in particular

in addition       furthermore     some

others              specifically

  • Words about ideas: for example, extrapolate, fallacy, contention, and substantiate
  • Words about actions: for example, levy, coalesce, placate, mediate, sanction, and stipulate
  • Words about attitudes: for example, belligerent, impetuous, pedestrian, complaisant, and wary
  • Words about communication and expression: for example, diatribe, aver, euphemism, and mandate
GMAT Syllabus: List of Useful Transitional Words
GMAT Syllabus: List of Useful Transitional Words
Fact or Opinion?

Can you distinguish between a fact and an opinion? Ask yourself 2 questions:

• Can this statement be debated? Yes, then opinion.

• Is this something known to be true? Yes, then probably a fact

Words that show evaluationor judgment, like good, interesting, bad, and important, usually signal an opinion. Here are some examples:

• She is a great motivator.

• The debate between the candidates was fascinating

Using Text Clues

Use the following 2 guidelines to find specific facts and details:

• Look at the structure of the passage and where that information is likely to be located.

• Look for key words in the question to tell you exactly what information to look for in the passage.

The Four Essay Types

Classification:This describes different kinds or types of a certain something. For example, a passage may describe to you the 3 types of flora of the Everglades.

Illustration:Presents specific facts, details, and examples that illustrate a particular theory, idea, or phenomenon. For example, the utilitarian passage in the pretest

Persuasion: Argues a specific position or point of view and aims to convince readers that this position or point of view is valid. For example, a passage may argue that all high school curricula should include mandatory community service. ■Analysis: Takes an idea or issue and breaks it down into its parts so that readers can better understand and evaluate the subject.

The Four Organizational Patterns

These basic patterns help writers effectively organize their ideas.

CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER – When writers use time to organize their ideas

ORDER OF IMPORTANCE – arranges ideas by rank instead of time. This essentially means that the first idea is not what happenedfirst; it is the idea that is most or least important.

COMPARISON AND CONTRAST – When we compare 2 or more things, we show how they are similar; when we contrast them, we show howthey are different

CAUSE AND EFFECT – A cause is a person, thing, action, or event that makes something happen (creates an effect); an effect is an event or change created by an action (or cause).

A note about the Quantitative Analysis Questions (a part of Reading Comprehension, not to be confused with the quantitative section of GMAT) like the 3rd question in the Pretest here:
GMAT Syllabus: A Note to Remember About the Quantitative Questions in the Reading Comprehension Section
GMAT Syllabus: A Note to Remember About the Quantitative Questions in the Reading Comprehension Section

Detailed Syllabus of GMAT Verbal: Critical Reasoning

Critical reasoning is a set of analytical skills that enable people to make effective arguments. For example, there is a hurricane outside, and I say it’s a good day to go for a walk to get some fresh air, you know something is wrong with my argument. But written and spoken arguments are often much more complicated, and the ability to think critically and judge the effectiveness of an argument is crucial to your success on the GMAT exam.

Assessment Pretest

Let’s first take an assessment pretest so you can know how much you are already capable of with regards to this sub-section of Verbal. We will present to you a couple of questions.

  • GMAT syllabus: Critical Reasoning Pretest Question 2
  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 9
Answers to your Pretest

1 (C), 2 (A)

How did it go? Congratulations if you answered both the questions correctly. Perhaps your critical reasoning skills are strong. Clearly, the more questions you get wrong, the more time you should devote to the review of that material.It is difficult to scale your performance on this pretest, because in GMAT both the number of questions answered and the level of difficulty of each question are used to determine your score. However, a simple percentage of correctly answered questions in each category should give you a good indication.

Elements of an Argument

An argument is a set of claims with a premise(s) and a conclusion. A claim is a statement (as opposed to a question or interjection) with a truth value—it is either true or false (although you may not know which). The conclusion of the argument is its main claim—what the arguer wants us to see, do, or believe. The premise is the claim or claims that provide support or reasons to accept the conclusion.

Argument = Premise(s) (supporting claim[s]) + Conclusion (main claim)

Here are some examples. The conclusion of each argument is underlined:

  • I do not see Xiomara anywhere. She must not have arrived yet.
  • You must spend 10 minutes each day doing yoga. Deep breathing and stretching will improve your mood and health. They are easy to fit into your day.
  • A flat tax is the answer to our tax troubles. It would treat everyone fairly and would dramatically simplify the tax code. This would make filing taxes easier and make many Americans feel better about giving their money to the government.

Notice that this last argument offers several premises to support its conclusion:

1. A flat tax would treat everyone fairly.

2. A flat tax would simplify the tax code.

3. A flat tax (because it would simplify the tax code) would make filing taxes easier.

4. A flat tax (because it would treat everyone fairly) would make Americans feel better about paying taxes.

Qualifiers

Qualifiers are phrases and words that have the ability to limit the scope of a claim to help make an argument more valid (more likely to be true). For example, take a look at the following arguments:

1. Don’t believe anything politicians say. All politicians are corrupt.

2. Don’t believe most of what politicians say. Most politicians are corrupt.

3. Be careful believing what politicians say. A lot of politicians are corrupt.

Which argument is the strongest? Although argument 1 is the most assertive, it’s also the weakest argument. This makes it the least likely to be true because it uses absolute terms (anything and all) in both its conclusion and premise.

Argument 2 is far more strongsince it effectively uses the word “most”in order to qualify its conclusion and premise. However, it still tells you not to believe most of what politicians say. It also tells you that the most corrupt politicians probably don’t lie most of the time. Hence, it still declares that most politicians are corrupt. This is a claim that will likely be tough to prove. Argument 3 may seem to you the weakest because of the use of its qualifiers. However, it is actually the strongest. It is the most plausible argument of the 3 and also the most likely to be true.

GMAT Syllabus: Qualifiers - List of Few words and Phrases That Can Significantly Strengthen Arguments
GMAT Syllabus: Qualifiers – List of Few words and Phrases That Can Significantly Strengthen Arguments

GMAT Syllabus of Critical Reasoning: Types of Passages

  • Critical reasoning questions, for example reading comprehension questions, are based upon reading passages about a wide range of topics, althoughthere are a few important differences.
  • For one thing, the critical-reasoning passages are much shorter—only one or two paragraphs—and each passage only has one question.
  • Some of these arguments are known to be logical and well reasoned; others are supposed to be built upon faulty logic or invalid assumptions.
  • Unlike the reading comprehension passages, you need not to know anything about the topic discussed in the passage for answering the succeeding question correctly.
  • In fact, sometimes your knowledge of the topic may interfere undesirably with making the correct choice.
  • It may lead you to choose an answer that is not supported by the information in the passage.

GMAT Syllabus of Critical Reasoning: Types of Questions

Structure: these questions are known to test your ability to recognize basic argument structure. For example, you may be asked to identify the conclusion, premises, or underlying assumptions of an argument.

Evaluation: questions test your ability to measure the effectiveness of an argument and recognize common errors in reasoning. You might be asked to identify factors that would strengthen or weaken theargument, for example, or which aspect of the argument rests on faulty logic.

■Extension: these questions are known to test your ability to determine effective and appropriate plans of action. You may be asked to evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of a proposed plan of action or to identify what assumptions underlie a particular proposal.

Detailed Syllabus of GMAT Verbal: Sentence Correction

You can often tell when something sounds wrong, even if you don’t know exactly why it is wrong. Sticking to the GMAT syllabus, in the exam you have to identify which sentence is free of errors and written most effectively and not identify the grammar rule that has been broken.

24 Things to Remember about Grammar and Style:

  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 10
  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 11

Assessment Pretest

Let’s first take an assessment pretest so you can know how much you are already capable of with regards to this sub-section of Verbal. We will present to you a couple of questions.

  • GMAT Syllabus: Sentence Correction Pretest Page 1
  • GMAT Syllabus 2020: A Guide to Make You Study the Most Important Topics 12
Answers to your Pretest

1 (D), 2 (D)

How did it go? Congratulations if you answered both the questions correctly. Perhaps your sentence correction skills are strong. Clearly, the more questions you get wrong, the more time you should devote to the review of that material.It is difficult to scale your performance on this pretest because in GMAT both the number of questions answered and the level of difficulty of each question are used to determine your score. However, a simple percentage of correctly answered questions in each category should give you a good indication

GMAT Syllabus of Sentence Correction: Types of Questions

  • Sentence correction questions should return you to more familiar ground, as you are likely to have seen questions of this sort on previous standardized tests.
  • This last group of 11—12 questions gives you sentences that sound like they have been excerpted from newspaper or magazine articles, academic journals, or nonfiction books or textbooks.
  • So, you can expect the sentences to be serious and complex.
  • Once again, the passages can be about any topic, but you do not need to know anything about the topic to answer the question correctly.
  • For each question, the sentence is underlined in parts or entirely.
  • You must determine which of the 5 multiple-choice answers is the most correct and effective way to express the idea in the underlined portion of the sentence.

Sentence-correction questions are designed to measure two related but distinct aspects of effective writing: grammar and style.

These questions test your ability to identify and correct errors in standard written English and your understanding of what makes effective writing on the sentence level only. In contrast, the Analytical Writing Assessment section tests your ability to write effectively on three levels: the essay level, the paragraph level, and the sentence level.

Although the Analytical Writing Assessment section requires you to actually write your own essay, in this section, you do not have to write yourown sentences. You do not need to identify errors in mechanics, including spelling, capitalization, or punctuation,except as punctuation affects sentence boundaries and clarity. For example, you will not find sentences with misspelled words, improper capitalization, or misused hyphens or apostrophes, but you will find sentences that use a comma when a period should be used or sentences that misuse semicolons—punctuation issues that deal with establishing the right relationship between clauses and answers.

Grammar questions test your knowledge of the rules and conventions of standard written English,including correct sentence structure, idioms, and parallel structure. You will need to determine whethersentences have errors such as inconsistent verb tense, run-ons or fragments, or unparallel structure.

You will not need to identify errors in mechanics, including punctuation, spelling, or capitalization. These skills are not tested on the GMAT exam.

Style questions test whether you can identify sentences that are clear, precise, and concise. You will seemany versions of sentences that are wordy, redundant, vague, awkward, and/or ambiguous. You willneed to determine which version expresses the idea with the most clarity, precision, and concision.

These three types of questions (Reading, Critical and Sentence Correction) will be presented in random order throughout the Verbal section. Thus, your GMAT exam may begin with three or four questions based on a reading comprehension passage, then a sentence correction question, then two critical reasoning questions followed by another sentence correction question and reading comprehension passage.

GMAT Syllabus Part IV – Integrated Reasoning

You will find the 12 questions in the Integrated Reasoningsection to be formatted in a variety of ways. They will include tables and graphs to test how well you can apply reasoning skills to different scenarios.

This section will measure your ability to evaluate and understand multiple sources and types of information. These shall include graphic, numeric, and verbal, sources & types. You will have to use quantitative and verbal reasoning to solve complex problem.

You will find text passages, tables, graphs, and other visual information from a variety of content areas in this section.

This section differs from the Quantitative and Verbal sections in 2 important ways:

  1. IR section involves both mathematical and verbal reasoning, either separately or in combination.
  2. In the IR sections, questions are answered using four different response formats rather than only traditional multiple-choice.

There are 2 special features of this section:

  1. Many questions will require more than one response. You are specifically permitted to use an online calculator with basic functions to answer the questions.
  2. You must answer all responses to a question correctly because the questions are designed to test your ability to integrate data to solve complex problems. No partial credit (part-marking) will be given.

The questions in this section involve both quantitative and verbal reasoning, either separately or in combination.

There are 4 types of questions in the Integrated Reasoning Section:

  1. Multi-Source Reasoning
  2. Table Analysis
  3. Graphics Interpretation
  4. 2-Part Analysis

1. GMAT Syllabus: Multi-Source Reasoning

  • This type of question will measure your ability to examine data from multiple sources text passages, tables, graphics, or some combination of the three
  • It also measures your ability to analyze each source of data carefully to answer multiple questions.
  • Some questions may require you to recognize discrepancies among different sources of data.
  • Others may ask you to draw inferences, and still others may require you to determine whether data is relevant.
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Integrated Reasoning: Important Points to Remember about Multi Source Reasoning
GMAT Exam Syllabus of Integrated Reasoning: Important Points to Remember about Multi Source Reasoning

Question Formats of Multi-source Reasoning Questions

Two formats:

  • Multiple-choice questions
  • Multiple-dichotomous choice questions
2 Types of Formats for Multi-Source Reasoning Questions of the Integrated Reasoning Section in GMAT Exam Syllabus
GMAT Syllabus for MBA: 2 Types of Formats for Multi-Source Reasoning Questions of the Integrated Reasoning Section in GMAT Exam Syllabus

2. Syllabus of GMAT: Table Analysis

This type of question will measure your ability to sort and analyze a table of data, similar to a spreadsheet, in order to determine what information is relevant or meets certain conditions. You will be able to sort the table on any of its columns by selecting the column’s title from a drop-down menu. You may find a brief text explaining the table or providing additional information.

GMAT Syllabus: Important Points to Remember about Table Analysis in Integrated Reasoning Section
GMAT
GMAT Exam Syllabus: Important Points to Remember about Table Analysis in Integrated Reasoning Section

Tips & Strategies for Table Analysis

The most common calculations in this section will be statistical ones, such as averages, percentages, ratios, and medians, so table-analysis questions may be some of the easiest questions to answer in the IR section.

Tips for the Table Analysis questions in the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT Syllabus
GMAT Syllabus for MBA: Tips for the Table Analysis questions in the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT Syllabus

3. Syllabus of GMAT: Graphics Interpretation

Important Points about Graphics Interpretation questions in the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT Syllabus
GMAT Syllabus for MBA: Important Points about Graphics Interpretation questions in the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT Syllabus

Tips & Strategies for Graphics Interpretation

Tips and Strategies for Graphics Interpretation questions in the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT Syllabus
GMAT Syllabus for MBA: Tips and Strategies for Graphics Interpretation questions in the Integrated Reasoning Section of the GMAT Syllabus

4. Syllabus of GMAT: Two-Part Analysis

  • This type of question will measure your ability to solve complex problems.
  • Questions may be quantitative, verbal, or some combination of both.
  • The format is intentionally made versatile to cover a wide range of content.
  • Your ability to evaluate trade-offs, solve simultaneous equations, and discern relationships between 2 entities will be assessed.

Two-Part Analysis questions present to you a short written description or problem. You are asked to make 2 choices related to that information. These choices have to be connected to each other in some way.

For example, the choices might be a set of two steps involved in solving a problem or two components required to successfully complete a task.

Questions Formats of 2-part Analyses

GMAT Syllabus: Questions Formats of 2-Part Analysis
GMAT Syllabus for MBA: Questions Formats of 2-Part Analysis
  • The possible answers, as well as your choices, shall be given in a table format.
  • All possible answers will be listed in the 3rd column, to the right of the table. Your choices for the 1st part and 2nd part of the question will be recorded in the 1st and 2nd columns of the table, respectively.
  • Remember, you will have to make a choice for each of the 1st two vertical columns of the table and certainly not one for each horizontal row.

Useful Links

  1. GMAT Exam Pattern
  2. GMAT Official Portal
  3. GMAC’s (not a typo–it’s the GMAT test-maker!) Handbook for GMAT Exam.
  4. Entire code list for accredited programs
  5. GMAT Write™ – GMAC’s essay writing practice tool
  6. Check GMAC’s Integrated Reasoning Prep Tool®

Conclusions

Good to have you, finally, on this other side! Looking forward to getting admission in an esteemed business school of global repute? Hope we’ve been able to help you with most of the knowledge that you were asking for. We’ve just finished presenting to you all the details of the GMAT syllabus for MBA & other Master’s courses, every question type of the GMAT subjects and specific details about every topic covered in the GMAT exam syllabus. Nevertheless, do you need some handholding to get you through this? How about a discussion with our expert career counsellors with decades of experience concerning education in this field? Thanks!